The Wheaten Terrier is a medium-sized dog with a distinctive silky, gently curling coat that gives a natural, unfussy look. This dog has a very distinctive coat – described as being the warm colour of ripening wheat. Adult male Wheaten Terriers measure about 46-49cm and weigh about 16-20.5kg. Adult females should be slightly less.

I've looked after dogs before, so I have some experience
I'm happy with breeds that may need some training
I'd like to go on active walks with my dog
For an hour a day
A medium size dog works for me
Dog drool? As little as possible, please!
I've got time for grooming every other day
Yes, I require a hypoallergenic breed
I love dogs that are chatty and vocal
Yes - Barks and alerts
No
No
Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier

Origin

The Irish farmer's answer to vermin problems, the Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier, bred and developed for over two hundred years, is a good ratter and an excellent farm dog. Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier dog breeds were first recognised by the Irish Kennel Club in the late 1930s and by the UK Kennel Club in the early 1940s. The Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier is the oldest native Terrier of Ireland and is proof that the Irish breeding talent does not begin and end with racehorses.

Personality

Soft Coated Wheaten Terriers have strong personalities and a sense of fun. As long as they are included in everything you do, they will prove trustworthy companions. They will keep you on your toes by occasionally misbehaving, but are generally high-spirited in the nicest possible way. They are quick to learn, but, like most terriers, they can be stubborn.

Health

The Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier is generally a healthy breed but there are a number of inherited conditions they can suffer from. The main ones are a particular type of inherited kidney disease and gastrointestinal disease. They are also prone to allergic skin disease.

Exercise

Soft-Coated Wheaten Terriers are active dogs that need sufficient exercise or they can become somewhat unruly indoors. An hour daily should be considered the daily minimum for an adult Wheaten – though more would be preferable if you can offer it.

Nutrition

Your dog's diet needs to have the right balance of all the main nutrient groups including a constant supply of fresh water. It's important to conduct regular body condition scores to ensure you keep your dog in ideal shape and remember to feed him at least twice daily and in accordance with the feeding guidelines of his particular food.

Grooming

The non-shedding silky, gently curling coat will need to be groomed several times a week to keep it clean, shiny and tangle-free. Grooming needs will be greater between the ages of 7 to 24 months when the adult coat comes in.

Best Dog Breeds for Children

While many dogs are traditionally thought of as being good with children , all dogs and children need to be taught to get on with and respect each other, and be safe together. Even so, dogs and young children should never be left alone together and adults should supervise all interactions between them.

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Wheaten Terriers are instantly recognisable by their silky coats. High-spirited with a sense of fun, they make great companions. Find out more at Purina today.

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What to Consider next

Adoption

It is incredibly fulfilling to adopt a dog from an animal shelter or rescue organization. It often means offering them a second chance in life. There are many dogs waiting for a loving family, a forever home. Reputable centers will be very careful about matching the right people with the right dogs. Staff learns all they can about the dogs they take in, and will spend time getting to know you, your family and your lifestyle, before they match you with any of their dogs. They’ll also be happy to give you advice and answer any questions you might have before and after the adoption.

Finding a good breeder

If your heart is set on a pedigree puppy, then your best bet is to find a reputable breeder. Contact The Kennel Club or a breed-club secretary who may have a list of litters available, or should be able to put you in contact with breeders in your area. Try to choose a breeder who is part of the Kennel Club’s assured breeder scheme.Visit dog shows to meet breeders in person and inquire about availability of pups of your chosen breed.

Welcoming your dog home

Whether you’re bringing home a tiny puppy or rehoming an adult dog, this is a hugely exciting time for everyone. While you’re waiting for the big day you might need to distract yourself, so luckily there are a few things you need to sort out before you welcome your new arrival. Click here for more information